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  • Universal Program Number:0048-9999-13-231-H05-P
    Expires: December 17, 2016
    Program Length:  0.1 CEU
    Target Audience:  Pharmacists
    Knowledge based activity

    Facilitated by Brian Hocum, this course discusses the fundamental factors of pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions and provides clinical pearls for the everyday practicing clinician.

    Self enrolment
  • Universal Program Number: 0048-0000-12-081-H01-P

    EXPIRES: October 9, 2015
    Program Length: 0.1 CEU
    Target Audience: Pharmacists
    Knowledge based activity

    Description: It is estimated that about 400,000 people in the United States are living with MS.1 The disease most commonly effects people in Europe, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. It appears as though incidence and prevalence increase the farther you get from the Equator. Women tend to be affected 1.5-2.5 times more than men. Peak onset in patients is usually between the ages of 25 and 35, with a sharp increase after adolescence and a shallow decline after the peak age. Genetics play a strong role in multiple sclerosis. It is estimated that one’s risk for MS is 30 times higher if you have a sibling with MS.2 Other environmental factors are thought to contribute include sunlight exposure, infections, vaccines, tobacco, nutrition, and xenobiotics, but no association has been confirmed.2,3

    Self enrolment
  • Universal Program Number: 0048-0000-12-080-H04-P

    EXPIRES: October 9, 2015
    Program Length: 0.1 CEU
    Target Audience: Pharmacists
    Knowledge based activity

    Description: Prescription stimulants such as dextroamphetamine/amphetamine combination (Adderall®), methylphenidate (Concerta®), and lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse®) are schedule II medications and are the most commonly prescribed drugs to children and adults for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD is one of the most common childhood disorders and can continue into adolescence and even into adulthood. The common symptoms include difficulty staying focused and paying attention, difficulty controlling behavior, and over activity. Symptoms usually improve as the patient grows older. It is estimated that about 8 percent of children 4-17 years old are diagnosed with ADHD. 1 These drugs are very effective in the treatment of ADHD but also have the potential for both abuse and addiction.

    Self enrolment
  • Universal Program Number: 0048-0000-12-079-H01-P

    EXPIRES: October 9, 2015
    Program Length: 0.1 CEU
    Target Audience: Pharmacists
    Knowledge based activity

    Description:  The substance 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine is commonly known as MDMA. MDMA has many names and can be referred to as: ecstasy, E, X, XTC, Rolls, Beans, Adam, or Molly. MDMA is popular with young people involved in the dance culture.1 MDMA tablets are commonly known to be impure and often mixed with other drugs of abuse. Although MDMA is not a prescription drug, it is important for pharmacists to be aware of this substance because it has many adverse effects that may require medical management.

    Self enrolment
  • Universal Program Number: 0048-0000-12-078-H04-P

    EXPIRES: October 9, 2015
    Program Length: 0.1 CEU
    Target Audience: Pharmacists
    Knowledge based activity

    Description: Several over-the counter-medications are commonly used for unintended recreational purposes or as ingredients for illicit drugs. Over the years, many restrictions have been placed on the purchase of these medications, but there are always those who seek to find a way around these regulations. As a pharmacist, you are the medication gatekeeper of the community and the responsibility falls on you to prevent the abuse of medication in order to protect your patients. This lesson will be broken down by individual medications in order to go into more depth.

    Self enrolment
  • Universal Program Number: 0048-0000-12-077-H01-P

    EXPIRES: October 9, 2015
    Program Length: 0.1 CEU
    Target Audience: Pharmacists
    Knowledge based activity

    Description: The following is a comprehensive summary of the individual guidelines provided by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), the American Diabetes Association (ADA), and the American Geriatrics Society (AGS). The summary will focus on the ADA guidelines and highlight specific differences between the other organizations’ guidelines. In addition, recommendations will be made to help guide pharmacists to the most appropriate guidelines to use for a specific patient. Information designated by orange boxes denotes a difference in recommendations by the AACE. Information in blue boxes emphasizes a difference in recommendations by the AGS.

    Self enrolment
  • Universal Program Number: 0048-0000-12-076-H01-P

    EXPIRES: October 9, 2015
    Program Length: 0.1 CEU
    Target Audience: Pharmacists
    Knowledge based activity

    Description: Current categories for compounds of abuse in the United States include alcohol, tobacco, opioids, club drugs, cannabinoids, stimulants, dissociative drugs, hallucinogens, anabolic steroids, inhalants and prescription medications. Heroin, also known as smack, H, skag, or junk, falls into the category of opioids and is the most abused drug in this category.1 This is because it is rapid acting with a time to peak plasma absorption of 10 minutes after I.M. administration and it crosses the blood brain barrier faster than morphine, the drug heroin is manufactured from.2 Morphine is produced by the seed pods of the poppy plant and then sold in a pure form or sometimes mixed/“cut” with substances such as sugar, quinine, powdered milk or even some poisons to produce street heroin.1

    Self enrolment
  • Universal Program Number: 0048-0000-12-075-H01-P

    EXPIRES: October 9, 2015
    Program Length: 0.1 CEU
    Target Audience: Pharmacists
    Knowledge based activity

    Description: Addiction is a growing problem in society as more people experiment with illicit drugs and fall into drug addiction as a consequence. Addicts tend to exhibit symptoms of drug tolerance with continued abuse and may develop substance dependence. As one continues to use a drug to achieve a “rush” or a “high”, some must use increasing amounts of a given drug to achieve the same high that was experienced previously, depending on the substance used. Many addicts continue to increase doses until drug-induced overdose or death occurs. Addicts are also fueled by the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms, which may range from nausea and resting tremors to anxiety and insomnia1. If the search for drugs interferes with daily living, this is called substance dependence, as one plans time and resources around acquiring the next hit of drug.

    Self enrolment
  • Universal Program Number: 0048-0000-11-035-H01-P

    EXPIRES: June 7, 2014
    Program Length: 0.1 CEU
    Target Audience: Pharmacists
    Knowledge based activity

    Description: Research within the past decade has shown that the physiological roles of vitamin D go beyond calcium homeostasis, skeletal development and bone metabolism. The discovery of vitamin D receptors and 1-hydroxylase on a variety of extraskeletal tissues has prompted research on the effects of vitamin D on multiple physiological systems and processes. Vitamin D deficiency is widely known to be directly associated with skeletal diseases such as osteoporosis and rickets. However, vitamin D deficiency has also been linked to diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline, and certain cancers. Due to the increasing prevalence and emerging evidence of consequences of vitamin D deficiency, it is becoming an important health concern. In the past two years, the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin D has been increased twice for infants, toddlers, adolescents, and adults.(1,2)
    Self enrolment
  • Celiac Disease: Current and Investigational Therapies and the Role of the Pharmacist
    UAN: 0048-0000-14-032-H01-P

    Self enrolment
  • A Comparison of Mipomersen (Kynamro®) and Lomitapide (Juxtapid®): [K1] Medications for the Treatment of Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Ann Marie Ruhe, fifth-year pharmacy student from Cincinnati, Ohio; Austin Brown, fourth-year pharmacy student from Forest, Va; Ginny Daniels, fourth-year pharmacy student from Dover, Ohio; Kelsey Fink, fifth-year pharmacy student from Hudson, Ohio; David Bright, PharmD, BCACP, assistant professor of pharmacy practice


    Self enrolment
  • FDA Approves New Tuberculosis Drug: Sirturo® (bedaquiline)

    0048-0000-13-176-H01-P
    0.1 Hour
    Self enrolment

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Continuing Pharmacy Education for Pharmacy Professionals

brought to you by Raabe College of Pharmacy at Ohio Northern University

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